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This is a fantastic reference book for llama and alpaca owners.  You can get it from us here.  You can also find it at Amazon.com and other bookstores.  If you find an older edition, it's still a great reference; the new one just has a few new paragraphs about West Nile virus (good idea to vaccinate if you have a lot of mosquitos, or the virus is prevalent in your area)
 

LPOW

02/28/2014

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When choosing a name for a llama, we heed the warning that names can often become self-fulfilling prophecies.  We wouldn't want to name a llama 'Trouble', or 'Leaper', or 'Spitfire'.  The llama pictured above is named Santos, which usually refers to saintly or holy things.  In this case, he is pretty much the opposite.  In the pasture, he is the one we have to catch first, or he will come after the other llamas, spitting and cursing.  (well, it sounds like profanity)
He is a great pack llama, though. Once he is haltered, he knows we aren't going to put up with his nonsense, and he settles down and is fine in the barn and on the trail.  Most llamas seem to take their job as pack llamas pretty seriously, and are all business on the trail, and in camp, regardless of how they act in the pasture. 


 

LPOW

02/19/2014

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A slow-down on the morning commute to the north pasture.

 
 
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Solitaire looks like he has a snowy chin to go with his snowy nose, but that's his real-life, upside-down, Got Milk? mustache.

 
 
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LPOW!

01/28/2014

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PictureWhose woods these are I think I know...

















In the grand tradition of NASA's APOD (Astronomy Picture of the Day), (which is really freaking awesome, in every sense of that over-used word) (guilty!) we proudly present the Llama Picture of the Week.  Here, we stop by the woods on a snowy day.  My little llama thinks it queer that I didn't bring him a bucket of grain.

 
 
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Sleeping bag coats in stock, ready for the cold weather.  These lightweight and economical coats are easy to use, stay put, and give old llamas more insulation in cold weather.  Since they're made from thrift store finds, they vary wildly in color, and they may be slightly different size and thickness.  They have all been through a test-fitting on our patient and photogenic llamas.





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Blizzard weighs in at 375 lbs, and doesn't need a coat, but he was happy to model this lovely green one.
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Solitaire weighs about 300 lbs, and he doesn't need a coat either, but he volunteered for the photos.
 
 
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This a great publication for anyone interested in the outdoors and llama packing.
The magazine has recipes, gear recommendations, training tips, and lots of cool stuff.

 
 
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It rained and it rained and it rained.  Never had we seen so much rain.  Never did we think we'd ever say, "Enough rain!" in Colorado. 
Ah well, the fences needed fixed anyway.

 
 
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One of the most toxic pants in North America also really pretty.  It's not what you want to see along the ditch that runs through your hay field, though. Water hemlock, cicuta, (c. maculata, above)  is a member of the carrot family (Apiaceae).  The white clusters of flowers look similar to Queen Anne's lace and cow parsnip.  It grows in wet meadows, and along streams and lakes. 

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Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota) on the left, and water hemlock on the right.
Stem and leaves.  The stem is hollow and smooth.  For as poisonous as it is, water hemlock is surprisingly common in Colorado.  For more info, a great resource is Field Guide to Plants Poisonous to Livestock : Western U.S. by Shirley Weathers, available from amazon.